Minor

Students must complete fifteen (15) hours of Literature or Writing Electives.

LA211 Children’s Literature 3 credits

This course focuses on identification of materials suitable for children’s reading. A thorough study of Genre is an important component of this class, as well as the study of quality authors and illustrators of children’s literature.

Offered every fall.

LA302 Introduction to Literature 3 credits

This course is an introductory survey of literature, including fiction, poetry, and drama. The course emphasizes development of the student’s ability to read critically and analytically and write in response to the literature.

Offered every spring.

LA312 Multicultural Literature 3 credits

A general survey of multicultural literature, including literature written by or about minorities and literature from nonwestern countries outside the United States. Literature will be examined according to its general literary value and the cultural perspective of the writer.

LA351 Literature for Adolescents 3 credits

This course is designed to expose students to quality adolescent literature. Particular emphasis is given to examination of current issues, including censorship, multiculturalism, various approaches to reading, the relation of adolescent literature to classic literature, and the integration of adolescent literature into thematic units.

Offered fall, odd years.

LA391 Selected Topics In Writing 1 credit

This course is an intermediate writing course for students interested in pursuing individual interests in writing, e.g. “Creative Writing,” “Research Writing,” “The Novel,” etc. This course is typically offered as an independent study upon request. Repeatable (with different topics).

or

LA393 Special Topics in Writing 3 credits

This course is offered either as a faculty-selected topic course or as an independent study. As a faculty-directed course, the selected topics will rotate. Not all Selected Topics courses will count toward the composition sequence, but they will count as general elective hours.  As an independent study, this course is available for students (upon request) who are interested in pursuing individual interests in writing, e.g. “Creative Writing,” “Research Writing,” “The Novel,” etc. This course may substitute for English Composition II upon approval. Repeatable (with different topics).

LA397 Selected Topics in Literature 1 credit

This course is designed for students interested in pursuing particular interests in literature, including studies of specific writers, genres, time periods, or topics. The course is typically offered as an independent study upon request.  Repeatable (with different topics).

or

LA399 Selected Topics in Literature 3 credits

This course is offered either as a faculty-selected topic course or as an independent study. As a faculty-directed course, the selected topics will rotate. These courses will count as literature elective hours for the required general education humanities core.  As an independent study, this course is available for students (upon request) who are interested in pursuing particular interests in literature, including studies of specific writers, genres, time periods, or topics. Repeatable (with different topics).

The below listed courses, offered online through the College of Adult and Graduate Studies (AGS), may also be taken for this minor.

See the AGS catalog for course descriptions

ENG2260 American Literature I, Beginnings to 1865 3 credits 5 weeks

This course is a survey in American literature from the beginnings through 1865. The syllabus is therefore designed to introduce students to a variety of different writers—such as Benjamin Franklin, Catharine Sedgwick, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Emily Dickinson—and consider how literature and culture changed from the colonial period through the early national period and the antebellum. In doing so, students will also explore the different forms popular in these periods, from sermons and autobiographies to short stories, poems, and novels.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG2280 American Literature II, 1865 to Present 3 credits 5 weeks

This course explores foundational works of the period, focusing on the American literary consciousness and shifting literary strategies, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Attention is given to canonical works, as well as works that expand that canon from 1865 to the present.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG3260 British Literature I 3 credits 5 weeks

This course explores the critical and historical approaches to the writers of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, including the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, and Milton.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG3280 British Literature II 3 credits 5 weeks

This course explores the critical and historical approaches to the writers of the long Eighteenth Century, the Romantic period, and the Victorian Age, including Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Hopkins.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG3400 Editing Essentials 3 credits 5 weeks

This course focuses on editing written texts at three levels: for correctness (grammar, mechanics, spelling and punctuation); for precision (unity, order, coherence, emphasis); and for style (syntax, level of detail, tone, diction, voice). Students will perform close analysis of surface features of their own and professional writing, and they will complete exercises designed to strengthen their ability to edit written texts at the three levels named above.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG3800 Professional and Technical Writing 3 credits 5 weeks

This course focuses on effective writing for careers in business, law, government, and ministry. Strategies for research and writing of correspondence and reports will be explored with emphasis on understanding and responding to a variety of communication tasks. Attention will be given to the rhetorical concerns of author, audience, text, and purpose as well as clear organization and a professional style.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG4100 18th Century Novel 3 credits 5 weeks

This course focuses on the origins and development of the novel as a literary form through the eighteenth century.  English majors will read and consider works by a number of canonical authors and innovators of the novel over the course of the eighteenth century. In addition, students will become familiar not only with important figures in the novel’s development but also with the main novel genres produced. Students will examine criminal, realist, sentimental, and Gothic novels.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG4200 History and Nature of the English Language 3 credits 5 weeks

This course considers the origin and nature of language, semantics, intercultural communication, the history of English, and current issues and trends in grammar and linguistics, with application to life, literature, and the mass media. The course also examines the structure and vocabulary of English through its major periods: Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English. The course focuses on changes in sounds (phonology), in forms of words and their endings (morphology), in sentence structure (syntax), in spelling (orthography), in meanings of words (semantics), and in vocabulary (lexicon). In the course of study, some attention is also given to social and political factors affecting the language.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG4400 Modern Rhetorical Theory 3 credits 5 weeks

This course is an introduction to modern rhetoric—the theory and practice of communication in our own times as informed by a tradition that goes back to the ancient Greeks and Romans but has been reinterpreted to account for the shifting contexts of modern life. This course focuses primarily upon the study of twentieth and twenty-first century rhetorical theory and theorists. Students will address a variety of topics, including rhetoric, science, and argumentation; rhetoric and meaning; dramatism; critical approaches to rhetoric; gendered rhetorical theories; non-Western rhetorical theories; rhetoric, media, and technology; postmodern approaches to rhetoric; and cultural studies. Students will also consider a variety of approaches to rhetorical criticism that influences professional and technical communication.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100

ENG4800 Capstone Course (Writing for Publication) 3 credits 5 weeks

This course explores the practice of writing for publication in various genres and technologies. The intent is to help graduating students increase the number of opportunities they will have to publish academic and workplace manuscripts that acknowledge the distinctive requirements and expectations of each discourse community. Students will become familiar with academic journals in their field of study, prepare a developing manuscript for future publication, and provide peer reviews of colleagues’ articles. In addition, students will explore the various genres and shifting technologies employed in the area of workplace and ministry communication that use traditional forms (newspaper, periodicals, radio/TV) as well as emerging forms (corporate blogs and social media, mobile, and online methods) to reach an increasingly more sophisticated and demanding reader.

Prerequisite:
ENG1000, ENG2000, and ENG2100